Seeing Cuba for the first time, Christopher Columbus said, “The goodliest land that eye ever saw, the sweetest thing in the world.” After five hundred years, Columbus’s words are still relevant, and what’s more intriguing is the fact that visiting Cuba by ship is the best way to absorb the rich history and personal warmth of her people.

As you may have heard, Cuba is not like any place you’ve been before. Witnessing the outward detail of her majestic decay contrasted against the inner beauty of her people will challenge you in ways that can be transformative. You can find yesterday in Cuba, but I urge you to use your travels to Cuba to break your pattern of repetition, cut loose the modern grid of predictability and allow yourself to be challenged intellectually and emotionally. Ask some questions that Cuba can help you answer. For example, why do you associate newness with relevancy, or is it right to relate material possessions with identity?

One little known fact about Cuba that is easily overlooked until you visit the island nation is the virtual absence of modern commercial advertising. In fact, Havana is one of the few remaining major cities in the world where garish advertising does not frame the view of every street corner. The same applies to all of Cuba’s urban environments and rural landscapes.

Expect your immersive, perspective-shifting journey aboard the Aegean Odyssey to make a lasting impact during your visit and even after you return. The art of slow travel is as much about your inward journey as it is about the new geographies and people you will encounter.

Simons Chase

Editor of Cuba Journal

Author: VTA Cuba

VTA Cuba info

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